how to look natural on camera text with image of woman smiling

How To Look Natural On Camera: Makematic Behind-the-Scenes Vlog

In episode 14, I’m showing you how to look natural on camera. Not for the purpose of Zoom calls or Zoom presentations, as I am still working on that. This is to produce quick vlogs at home or for that TikTok video that you’ve been working on for 30 minutes, just so you could get the lip-sync timing right.Read More

image of woman putting her phone down on a bench

Try Putting Down Your Device For A Day

In 1946 Edgar Dale who was an American educator, developed the Cone of Experience also known as the Learning Pyramid. It has become a staple of the education sector.  It examines how learners retain knowledge after interaction with different types of media.Read More

Image of student doing online learning/home schooling/distance learning

Our Faithful And Educating Friend

If there is anything we have learned in the past year, it’s that video is no longer a nice-to-have but has become instead an essential part of the educational content blend at whatever level of education we examine.Read More

Video Content in 2020

Video Content in 2020

It is the end of a long year, what better way to end than to do my usual and have a quick round-up of how video content has been growing as a consumer favourite in 2020.

Whilst international physical boundaries have been closed due to the Covid crisis, digital traffic has increased hugely.  From our perspective as a business who produces short-form educational video targeting post-millennials and millennials, we have seen pretty explosive growth this year as brands, publishers and non-profits all turn to short-form animated and live-action video to educate their audiences.

According to Cisco, who this time last year said that in any given second 1 million minutes of video are crossing the internet, at the end of 2020, they say that 75% of all internet traffic is video content, and this will rise to 82% by 2022.

Publicis and Verizon in a joint study have discovered that a lot of video content is consumed on the go or at work and as a result of this, 92% of those in their study watch video with the sound off.  So captions are becoming a must!

More than 2 billion people use Youtube – that’s one-third of all internet users with around 5 billion videos watched on Youtube every day, and Youtubers are uploading 500 hours of video every minute.  According to Social Media Today, 82% of Twitter users mainly use the platform to watch videos. These are mostly mobile users as well since roughly 90% of all video views on Twitter happen via mobile phones. 

We already know that most view video content via mobiles courtesy of eMarketer’s study in 2018, so this has only grown since then. We are nearing the point where everyone who possibly can in terms of device ownership, will view short-form video content on a daily basis, wherever they are, anywhere in the world. What’s interesting to learn from Brand Gym is that when consumers are viewing adverts on a mobile device, 75% skip the advertising in an average of 5.5 seconds (ie: as soon as they can!), so if advertising-supported video content is your strategy, then it’s completely the wrong one and something needs to change.   

On the educational front, video-assisted learning has become more and more popular.  Classrooms are awash with high-tech digital displays and now that schools are connected to the internet worldwide, video has become an important part of everyday learning – this has of course extended into the home this year.  The Covid pandemic has created the perfect environment for distance learning which has increased spectacularly with universities having to create high-quality distance learning modules with high production values for their video content.  Animated videos enrich subjects and help pupils and students understand complex subjects simply and easily in a format with which they identify.

The US government have recognised this and are awarding grants to those who produce educational video content. PBS Education an off-shoot of the network PBS has secured a $24M federal grant this year.  They’ve seen the opportunity that presents itself and are going to spend it on creating high educational value, curriculum-linked video assets and they’ve employed early-learning and children’s education experts and media producers to realise this project.

Those targeting post-millennials are getting it right.  I have often mentioned Blippi and how he’s grown to become a multi-million dollar brand in his own right through simply producing quality educational videos and posting them on Youtube. Last year he’d made about $12M. This year, judging by the merchandise in our house he’ll be making a lot more.  

In the past week, Ryan Kaja became the highest-earning Youtuber earning $29.5M from his Youtube child influencer shows and a further $200M from his branded toys and Marks and Spencer pyjamas.  Nickelodeon have now signed him for a series so next year that will only increase.

Without a doubt this year has been a big turning point for video content.  It was always on the cards that short-form educational video was going to become the learning medium for learning anything. But the fact that the entire population of the planet was forced online this year, whether they liked it or not, has made this happen now.  Not next year or the year after.  Today.  Those who choose to ignore this will simply be left behind.

Image of two women holding up a sign saying We Hosted A Webinar - Belfast Design Week

We Hosted A Webinar: Makematic Behind-The-Scenes Episode 8

If you’re like me, a 20-something-year-old who is eager to learn and try new things but at the same time who is terrified to learn and try new things because it’s – well – new, then you’ve come to the right page.

Public speaking. Two words that for some people it’s a walk in the park, but for others who don’t have that much experience in (a.k.a me) it’s a -20C walk in the park with sleet, heavy rain and realising that your coat doesn’t have a hood. This year, I decided to take that walk into public speaking, albeit it was online and someone else was there to co-host with me. Besides that, the nerves were there, the pit in my stomach was present and I ran out of breath a lot.

This episode of the vlog explores the journey that Tasha (our Social Media Producer) and I went through when we hosted our first webinar for Belfast Design Week. It was a journey, to say the least. We prepared our content a week before, figured out what we were going to say the day before and mentally preparing ourselves for the pressure two weeks before. So in short, a lot of prepping happened.

To ensure that the webinar ran smoothly, I had to venture back into the office to get reliable WiFi. If you have the same internet provider as me, which fails on a daily basis and consequently makes me appear to freeze during Zoom calls with an unflattering expression, then you know what the frustration feels like. I won’t name names as to who this said internet provider is as A) I might get in trouble for legal reasons and B) because I don’t want anyone else to suffer the same internet fate as I do.

If you haven’t already watched the vlog, have a look at it below!

https://youtu.be/koyyDE9H2Q4

Fun fact about this vlog, we practised the webinar 7 times. Practised social distancing whilst doing the webinar. And learnt that public speaking (virtually) isn’t too bad at all. Though I can’t vouch for in-person public speaking, I think that’s a whole other level of panic.

Watch episode 8 here!

Shameless plug right here, but after you watch the vlog, watch our webinar too called “How To Design Your Instagram Feed To Educate Your Audience”. It’s now live on the Makematic VOD. It’s short and sweet, and you might learn something about how gen Z wants to use Instagram now. If you don’t fancy watching and prefer reading, I did write about the webinar in this condensed version. Just to warn you, this doesn’t have as much information as the webinar, so you might as well watch the webinar.

Person watching video tutorials

The Evolution Of Vlogging

Our endless viewing of vlogs, baking tutorials and those fascinating videos from Jungle Survival, has Nellie Bly to thank. She can be considered as the world’s first blogger. In 1887, her work “Behind Asylum Bars” where she went undercover in a Women’s Lunatic Asylum on Blackwell’s Island went viral and changed the way institutions are run forever. Inspired by the book Around the World in 80 Days, Bly set sail in 1889 and documented her adventures – travel blogger (or vlogging) style. Her record-breaking trip only took 72 days!

Bly’s viral work and travel blogging got me thinking about how vlogging has dominated the way we tell stories and document our lives. 

And as someone who has done 7 vlogs (that you can watch here) and counting, I thought it would be interesting to dive into the evolution of vlogging and see how it has changed the way we tell stories. 

But Before That

You can find out more about Nellie Bly and other historical figures within our Hidden Histories collection from the Untold series – a project of the Driving Force Institute for Public Engagement. Produced and distributed by Makematic with the USC Center for Engagement-Driven Global Education.

The Early 2000’s

Adam Kontras. You’ve probably never heard his name, but he is known to have created the world’s first vlog. Kontras set off on a cross-country road trip and along the way, he would write blogs to send to his friends and family about his adventures. On January 2000, he posted a video with his blog, that shows him sneaking a cat into a hotel that has a “No Pets” policy, thus creating the first vlog.

On 24 April 2005, “Me at the zoo” by YouTube co-founder Jawed Karim was published on YouTube. You may not be aware of the significance of this video, but believe it or not, this was the first YouTube video ever. With Karim speaking in front of the camera and explaining his surrounding in this 18-second video, some even classify this clip as the first vlog ever on YouTube, which has 99M views and counting. 

The Bedroom Scene

Majority of the now-famous YouTubers began their vlogging careers in their bedroom talking in front of a webcam. However, one ‘video blogger’ as she phrased it in 2006, became the first viral sensation, first popular blogger on YouTube and first internet hoax. What a woman. Lonelygirl15  gained viewership quickly despite the seemingly ‘dull nature’ of the videos, pretty sure she says boring almost 6 times in her first video. However, a couple of months into her vlogging career, it was revealed that the channel was fake and that ‘Bree’ was actually an actress, and the whole series was produced LA-based creators. 

Despite the hoax that lonelygirl15 was, she paved the way for vlogging and future creators. She showed the world the potential of YouTube and how stories can be made, and it all started in the bedroom. It also shows you how old we are if you remember lonelygirl15. So thanks ‘Bree’.

The $21,000 First-Class Airplane Seat 

This was the first vlog I watched. To be honest, I didn’t want to watch vlogs back then because I would tend to feel jealous of what the person is showing me – like Casey Neistat (12.1M subs), who as the title states got a $21,000 first-class airplane seat, something that some of us can only get if we win the lottery. But after watching this vlog, I went down a deep rabbit hole and spent days watching his vlog channel.

Vlogs have evolved throughout the years and trying to write about it in one blog, is impossible. Famous vloggers, such as Casey, Liza Koshy (17.8M subs), David Dobrik (17.8M subs), have all brought something different to the vlogging world. Whether that’s playing truth or dare in public or filling the entire backyard with foam – vlogs can be about anything. 

Vlogs are about the authenticity of a creator. It’s about sitting down and talking in front of a camera or filming something completely different. Some vlogs have a staged element in them – pioneered by lonelygirl15 – and this isn’t necessarily a bad thing. It’s difficult to shoot something that happens spontaneously, after all, it’s not every day that you get to film the cutest baby talk ever. So planning your vlog content to make it more interesting is a good way to start. Personally, I think this video illustrates it perfectly, it’s a planned vlog that is so chaotic and entertaining that it makes you want to watch more. 

So there you have it, a condensed version of the evolution of vlogging. Vlogging continues to evolve and creators continue to rise on the internet. So why not start your vlogs today?

Animation of students studying in the classroom

Pay Attention. Powering Down In The Classroom.

If anything has been learned in our family since the onset of Covid-19 and home-schooling, it’s that when my 5 year old son would repeatedly arrive home saying school was a waste of time because it was so boring, it appears that he was telling the truth.  That is what I’ve gathered from the brief few months that we were involved in his day-to-day teaching before the summer holiday.

Before, when he found it difficult to get out of bed in the mornings and begrudgingly put on his school uniform muttering the obligatory “I don’t want to go to school every day it’s boring”, he was fully justified in his statement.

During our period of home-schooling, the only digital interaction with educational resources he had which was set by the school, was to look at and then print (good job we are one of the few that have a printer) the Twinkl worksheets which were emailed each day for him to fill in.  You would think it is an easy task and job done, but on many days, we had flat refusals from him.  Not because the subject matter was too difficult, or the subjects themselves were things he wasn’t interested in, but rather because there are only so many apples and pears or balloons or bears or bicycles an intelligent 5 year old can count or order or spell and then colour in, without going completely and utterly insane.

This is an issue which educationalists, parents and students have been talking about for a long time now.  Very little seems to have been done about it

Graesser and Person in the American Educational Research Journal 1994 (yes 1994!) stated “A researcher claims that on average, students in class only get to ask a question once every 10 hours!”  My son has complained of the same – “I am not allowed to ask many questions so I have to sit around and it’s boring”.   This coming from a child who constantly asks us questions about the world around him as part of his learning process.  And this research from 1994 (yes 1994!) backs up my son’s repulsion to the current way he and his subjects are taught, yet in the UK state sector certainly, very little has been done to ensure that children receive the digital and one on one stimulation they need at school which they receive in every other area of their everyday life.  Various Ministers in the UK have claimed to have sorted out the education system, but have they?  Not from our perspective.

I used to stand up at conferences and wave my arms about a lot encouraging audiences, mostly involved in education in one form or another to change the way they were doing things a bit.  Just a bit. Ten years or so ago, I used to plead, that in the same way, the audience themselves used Google and Youtube and Facebook, and indeed played a myriad of games which were appearing on phones and PCs as apps, it was vitally important that in order to avoid alienating the children they wished to educate, they needed to change direction radically and move education beyond the printed page.  Imagine a maths or history curriculum delivered as an adventure game?  Ironically that would fit right in with the way Netflix are making TV shows and movies for children right now, giving them choices and allowing them to learn from mistakes.  Now and again, after presenting I would be approached by someone who agreed, but more often than not, I would be met with the phrase “leaving no one behind” or the equivalent motto of the country that I was in.

Examining the complete and utter chaos of the A level and soon GCSE fiasco this year in the UK (particularly in England), the irony 10 years on, is that in the UK the very government who coined such fluffy phrases, commissioned an AI programme which seemingly was designed to make sure of just that – those from the most deprived areas would most certainly be left behind. 

The reality is that in just about every school education system around the world, whether or not every child at school has a laptop or an iPad, whether or not the school can stream video as part of the learning process in the classroom, it is all down to how much spend there is in education at a governmental level.  And in the UK, despite the government fluff, in real terms, it is diminishing year on year.  And as this happens more and more will continue to be left further and further behind.   

Perhaps, bearing in mind the workplace is about to revolutionised by AI with millions of jobs replaced by algorithms, this was the plan all along.

One of the most forward-thinking groups in education right now is based at the University of North Carolina Greensboro in North Carolina.  The Transforming Teaching Through Technology group based within the School of Education, have partnered with several schools and placed creativity at the centre of process through the creation of Maker Classrooms which emphasise making, creating and inventing.  

I remember seeing a video they made a long time ago – around about 2008 called Pay Attention!  It is of course still available to view on Youtube and in it, there were some statements made which 10 years later, I’m hearing echoing in my ear each time I have to focus on teaching my 5-year-old son.  High school students are quoted as saying “We have learned ‘to play’ school. We study the right facts the night before the test so we can achieve a passing grade and thus become a successful student’ and “When I go to school I have to power down”.  What is astounding is that the video is about a decade old and still we hear the very same phrases!

My son’s teacher is smart and fresh out of university.  Mrs Jones (not her real name) has from what we can see, been teaching the kids in as blended a way as she can with the elderly equipment and bad internet connection that she has.  For my son, the most important parts of home learning she sent before the summer break were the occasions where she made a video of herself reading a story.  I thought they were great.  Considering that they were filmed on a phone, the quality was first-rate, she was good at making the stories interesting and, in my view, if teaching young frustrated children becomes too much, she should pursue a career as a voiceover artist!  Each day when we signed into the school system to download what would inevitably be Twinkl’s colour in/match/draw-on/add-up worksheet, he asked if there was a video she had made to watch.  

Video is central to his life.  He is part of the post-millennial generation, and like every other child in his class and school, he has had wide access to technology since the minute he was aware of its existence.  Leaving no one behind doesn’t come into it!  Every parent has a phone with an internet connection.  Full stop.  For him and all of his peers, Youtube Kids, Youtube (under supervision) and Google (restricted) are his primary sources of information.  He ‘talks’ to Google and Youtube to find exactly what it is that he wants to know or see, and he has a program which reads out the text of sites like Wikipedia to him as he’s still getting up to speed with fluent reading.  The app highlights each word, something which for me in a past life placed me at the centre of great ridicule when I suggested to those I worked with that a simple karaoke-style reading app would effectively teach many millions to read.  It appears that in the case of my son and his friends, today something similar is doing just that.

All over the world children are returning to the classroom after a long period of learning in different ways.  Mrs Jones is once again going to have her work cut out in a couple of weeks time.  Children all over the world have for months been enthralled and educated by a myriad of different multimedia apps and services and of course Youtube.  When they re-enter the classroom in the coming weeks, once again the dragging of heels in our and many other households each morning will start all over again, as they are forced to power down in the classroom.  Paying attention doesn’t come into it.  Waiting 10 hours to ask a question does.

Image of man looking at his desktop computer

Educating YouTube

The drivers for digital disruption are a complex set of parameters.  We all know the names of the technology providers ubiquitous in our everyday life and their influence continues to grow and spread.

I have worked in and around the educational content sector for almost 30 years and it has been a period of profound change.  The obviously driver – technology is easy to talk about, but it is only since having children that I have realised the very profound effect that technology is having on the way that human beings learn and develop.

Always a good starting point for any argument about the differences in age groups are generational divisions, as there are fluctuations dependent on where the figures are researched.  Generational divisions give us a good clue as to where the products of the future will hook their consumers and bring commercial success.

My sons belong to the post-millennial generation.  They are hugely different to me I am beginning to see.  They process information incredibly quickly and work out what the important stuff is to know and, surprisingly, how to use it.  As an example, a friend of my eldest who is five fell in the park recently and hurt himself quite badly.  My son has never had any first aid training but has watched a few videos targeting children on Youtube (and I am sure, practised on his little brother!)  Instantly when his friend fell, he knew what to do.  Not only did he watch the video, but he also processed the information and was able to convert that into a real-world situation.  Facts are also all-important to him, and if I can’t answer one of the many questions that he wants answering each day, he instantly talks to Google who gives him the correct response as well as a multitude of others straightaway. 

Living in a fully multimedia world both born after the advent of social networking, and although they are not allowed anywhere near Tiktok, Facebook and Instagram, the eldest has worked out that people put videos of themselves ‘doing things’ on Youtube.  We can’t go out without the question popping up “Daddy, video me doing this and put it on Youtube”.

Pew Research reported recently that we have reached a point where Millennials have overtaken Baby Boomers as the largest demographic, and this is having great consequences on the way that consumers of education consume.  This is backed up by various demographic studies the United Nations have undertaken.

Looking at the broad-brush strokes of technological influence, TV was key for Baby Boomers, as it was for Generation X who were part influenced by the internet in terms of the way they prefer to consume content.  But Millennials and Post-Millennials have lived their lives surrounded by the internet, the mobile internet, and the networked economy.   This has had a drastic effect in the way they consume any type of media, be it mass-market or in the educational niche, and it is transforming the way they expect products to be structured, built and commercially modelled for them, taking into account that many parents are Millennials with children who are post-Millennials.

All the indicators right now show the smart money is being invested in video and VR technology for education, with all predictions pointing to the explosive growth of video content occurring in the mass-market, now spilling over into and consuming the education “niche”.

Anecdotally, a Youtube subscription has been the must-have during the Covid crisis amongst us and all the other parents of my sons’ peer groups.  Youtube with its Youtube Kids version is the current front runner when it comes to teaching children just about anything whilst keeping them amused in an environment which is safe.  I have noticed more and more that Youtube has become first choice for us all.

My eldest’s teacher at our local primary school is in her first year of teaching.  It is requested by the school that parents spend as much as we can afford on apps, so we and many others do.  The school makes recommendations, and this is added to our tally for Youtube and other direct-to-parent subscriptions each month.  My son’s teacher understands the frustration that he and many of his friends are feeling in their first year of school. Although most have had access to books before starting school, many find the change down from a blended multimedia learning pathway at home/nursery to a predominantly analogue one in the classroom exceedingly difficult.  This only compounds to the teacher’s overall stress.

During the period of lockdown when we were homeschooling, we had flat refusals on much of the work which was sent home for our eldest to complete.   I personally agreed with him.  I think I would have flatly refused a lot of it!  When talking to others this seemed to be par for the course with his age group, and we found different ways for our son to learn the same things in a ‘more multimedia way’.   Unguided, untested, untracked, and undeniably ticking all the learning objectives for the exercise and more.

The relationship between parents/schools/children is changing rapidly, that is for sure.  Parents have far more power within the supply chain for learning products and services and video is playing a central part in the learning pathways of a new generation of learners because video content is ubiquitous in everyday life and most globally have access to technology that can access it seemingly for free.  For any educational content provider, video must form a central pillar of current and future strategy.  

How is Youtube going to educate you?

What Will Your History Reveal For You?

We are currently entering a difficult time for the education sector because of the Covid-19 crisis.  I hear that universities in some countries are going to find as many as 90% of students deferring entry for a year, many of whom are overseas students and for whom therefore travel is almost impossible.

In our work at Makematic, we are involved in projects which bring a spotlight to historical figures and events which history has forgotten.   This is particularly relevant right now in terms of some of the issues that are being highlighted by the Black Lives Matter movement.

As a father of two boys who at 2 and 5 are members of the post-millennial generation, I see lots of differences between them and me. I love being a dad, and one of the things I find the most intriguing is the way that both boys consume content in a totally different way to me.  Call me a dinosaur, but it has only really been in the last year or so that I have become a daily Youtube user after my eldest introduced me to the wonders within.   I had seen it before as a place where people who had ego issues put videos of themselves doing zany things alongside adverts for brands that I had already seen.  How wrong I was and corrected I stand…Youtube is today an essential part of my everyday consumption of media alongside all the other user suspects- social networks, online news sites, streaming 24/7 hour news broadcasts, Netflix…oh, I forgot…and live tv.  

In the case of my two sons, Youtube has been a lifesaver over the past few months of home-schooling, supplementing (for that read ‘largely replacing’!) work set by school with action and fact-packed 2-8 minute shorts designed exactly to catch the short attention span of an under-10 and hold it until the job has been done.  

Particular favourites in our household include Horrible Histories (the title says it all),  Homeschool Pop (a channel packed with lots of short videos on different aspects of history and lots of other things) and Freeschool (short videos on subjects ranging from the top 10 fastest runners in the animal kingdom to the planets of our solar system and everything in between).

I have presented at conferences as well as written before that it is crucially important in the networked economy to target customers using a language, style and media output which your audience are going to identify with and understand. This is exactly what the channels targeting my sons are doing and from this connection with their audiences, huge international brands such as Blippi are appearing.  And at the moment, more than ever, millions of millennials and post-millennials are the leading voices for change across the world, examining the history that they’ve been taught more closely and deciding that it’s time to change it and create a more transparent truth of their own. That change is being led both in the home with the click of a mouse, as well as in the street.  

GlobalWebIndex identified as far back as 2017 that amongst 16-64-year olds, 92% watch video clips regularly online and in the case of live tv, this was largely becoming redundant in the majority of peoples’ lives.  According to Deloitte, binge-watching of online content is favourite amongst millennials whilst if it is post-millennials who are the primary concern, then the continuous connection to video content services are a must.  Coincidentally, (?) the actor who plays Blippi made $7 million dollars last year.

Because of the pandemic, we are witnessing a forced and faster drive to greater dependence on online content and services.  Video, which has historically been prevalent since the early days of VHS, has now become a key and central part of everyone’s lives and the length of time that a human being has to consume each ‘morsel’ of content has become considerably smaller.

History usually does repeat itself, and, dependent on which philosophy you follow, cycles usually speed up and shorten.  When looking back at this period, a time when many things changed, what will your history reveal for you?

So What's Your Title?

What Makes the Perfect Video Title? (DOs and DON’Ts)

It’s getting exponentially harder to get your videos noticed on any platform. The market continues to get oversaturated, but worry not though! Here are some Dos and Don’ts to make your video title stand out from the crowd.

After reading, why not check out our Adobe Social Media Video Course for some more insightful advice on how to create impactful videos for social media!

DO – Be Specific yet Succinct

Google truncates page titles at approximately the 66 character mark. Any longer and you’ll see an ellipse () at the end of your title. Since YouTube automatically adds “YouTube –” to the beginning of every view page’s title tag, you’re already 10 characters down before you even start. ” via. 5 Keys For Creating Viral YouTube Videos.

You have a fifth of a Twitter tweet to get your video’s main narrative across – not much is it? Be open to the challenge however, we’ll provide some further tips down below to what you should place in your title.

DON’T – Be Afraid To Grab Their Attention

Now, don’t assume I’m advocating for click-bait titles, let’s not go too crazy! However, it’s an increasingly growing trend, especially on YouTube and TikTok. Be descriptive yet enticing at the same time. Don’t undersell your creation, it’ll lose you on viewer engagement.

Let’s use a rather, ordinary activity as a vlog example.
Which would you rather click on (if you had to):

Of course, it’s unfair to compare two videos that have different publish dates, subscribers and overall viewer reach. However, I think it’s safe to say that Video Title #2 is more enticing as it tells a better narrative than just another ‘vlog of me walking the dog’, it creates intrigue and is a creative way to turn a mundane event into something viewers would want to see.

Another example we found, was from our Barbican video course with the Department of Culture, Arts & Leasure. The aptly-named “Make A Plant That Tweets When It’s Thirsty” – if that doesn’t pique your curiosity, I don’t know what will!

DO – Capitalise with the Occasional UPPERCASE

Hierarchy matters and despite it being a pet peeve by some people – Capitalising all main words helps provide a more professional tone for your videos – this is also assuming that grammar has been checked in advance.

The overuse of entirely UPPERCASING titles has thankfully started to dwindle in popularity, but that’s not to say you shouldn’t consider fully capitalizing the odd word or two – we recommend two shorter words or one long word at most.

Why does it matter? Our minds are naturally drawn to capitalized letters as it is more dominant on-screen – the more you emphasize a word on-screen the more priority our brains provide to read it. Our brain loves to make shortcuts and providing some sense of hierarchy to your wording can help get you that elusive viewer click.

DON’T – Forget Your Keywords

SEO is KING and to truly dominate online video, it must be taken into serious account. In recent years, it’s not just viewers you’re trying to attract to get your videos seen, it’s the hidden site algorithms that you have to appease. Search engine optimization is your new best friend in that regard.

While taking into account your character limitations, priority must be on making sure that the keywords you utilize, best fit the theme of your videos for example if you’re making a compilation? Try using BEST or TOP. Whichever niche you wish to create for, it’s always a good idea to put yourself in the viewer’s perspective and ask “What would the viewer search for to find my video?”.

Remember you also have your video descriptions to fill out more of the relevant keywords for your content. The idea is to make both the viewers and the streaming platform as easily aware of where your content fits as possible.

DO – Get Numeric

We delve more into this topic within our ‘Why Our Brain Loves Lists‘ blog, but statistics show that our brain becomes more accessible when numbers are utilized – it simplifies complex prose and helps the viewer to understand what the video is about in shorter times. This is especially vital for non-English speaking natives as numbers are universally more recognized in most forms and can help bridge the cultural and linguistic gap to open your videos to new demographics.

Utilizing a numeric structure for your video content also can help with your pre-production workflow. By setting a numeric limit on your content topics – you should be able to fill in more vital tips, advice, facts, etc. while not needing to divert into filler as a means to bridge gaps. Organization is key and numbers are a basic block that we can use to help provide some order and lessen that workflow chaos.

DON’T – Skip Analysing Your Competitors

I’m assuming you’re reading this and getting new into the ‘video production’ game, but regardless of what stage in your content creation days you’re in – it’s always vital to see what similar competitors to your work are doing.

Even if you’re up against corporate juggernauts of online video, if you see opportunities you can improve your A-game to their level of reach (i.e. branding, graphics, weekly video scheduling, pace, etc.), then it’s essential advice that can help to improve your overall content. Making small to long-term goals for your content platform is a great tool for increasing the quality and durability of your videos.

Don’t be disheartened, you’ll find many of channels that have failed also, analyze them, try to decipher what caused their declines to avoid making the same mistakes.

New Adobe Education Video Courses by Makematic

Our friends over at Adobe recently launched their brand new Youtube channel – Adobe for Education – featuring TWO courses that we’ve produced for them.

Make Impactful Video for Social Media

Make Impactful Video for Social Media

This course is for social media creators hoping to improve their video game using Adobe Premier Pro. It focuses on practical tips and strategies, brought to life by compelling graphics and interviews with exciting creators.

Design Principles

Basic Principles of Design

Unsurprisingly this collection of videos focuses in on the basics of design – complete with punchy explainer videos, practitioner interviews and creative ideas for teachers.

These are just the first two courses the team have been working on for Adobe – so expect loads more over the Summer!.

Privacy Settings
We use cookies to enhance your experience while using our website. If you are using our Services via a browser you can restrict, block or remove cookies through your web browser settings. We also use content and scripts from third parties that may use tracking technologies. You can selectively provide your consent below to allow such third party embeds. For complete information about the cookies we use, data we collect and how we process them, please check our Privacy Policy
Youtube
Consent to display content from Youtube
Vimeo
Consent to display content from Vimeo
Google Maps
Consent to display content from Google