Teaching Online Masterclass text on a white background

Teaching Online Masterclass (TOM) Series 2: Now Available

We’re pleased to announce that Teaching Online Masterclass (TOM) Series 2 is now available!

TOM is a free online professional development resource for educators making the leap into remote teaching and learning. With a catalogue of bite-sized videos produced in partnership with Innovate UK, TOM 2.0 will guide the skills K-12 educators can expand on to boost their online teaching. Watching and acting on the practical tips delivered in TOM series 2 will encourage confidence in teachers, and notably, create an enhanced online learning experience for students.Read More

Employee spotlight text with illustration of rights executive shirin edwards

Employee Spotlight: Shirin Edwards, Rights Executive

Have you ever wondered what goes on behind the scenes when we create our videos? This month, we spoke to Rights Executive, Shirin Edwards who’s only been at Makematic for 7 months but has already made a big impact on our production process.Read More

Solution to learning loss text with illustration of two students in front of a class

The Solution To Learning Loss – EdTech News May 2021

Learning loss and how the pandemic and hybrid learning have contributed heavily to it has been a debate for a while now.Read More

Image showing a young student learning and engaging in online classes

How To Increase Student Learning & Engagement When Learning Goes Online

Motivating and engaging learners can be challenging in any learning environment. But understanding self-determination theory will give you a structure for helping you do this. Self Determination Theory represents a broad framework for the study of human motivation. It suggests that when people are motivated to grow and change, they become self-determined.

We become more self-determined when we:

  • Master tasks and learn different skills (Competence)
  • Feel a sense of attachment and belonging to people (Relatedness)
  • Feel in control of our own goals and behaviours. (Autonomy)

Moreover, when people engage in activities for an inherent reward, (intrinsic motivation) it’s more motivating than carrot and stick ones (extrinsic motivation). For educators, this means that when designing online learning, it’s important to think about how to incorporate the elements listed above into online lessons or curriculum.

Creating Online Learning Experiences to Motivate and Engage Learners

Over the next couple of weeks, I’ll be sharing a number of evidence-based strategies to help educators motivate and engage your learners in online teaching environments. The strategies and activities will:

  • Encourage student-to-student interaction.
  • Facilitate online discussions, virtual brainstorming, and problem-based learning, and
  • Develop reflective thinking practices.

Because I don’t want to keep you waiting, check out educator Michael Cohen’s three strategies for increasing student engagement online that you can use in your classes today!

Coming Soon

Teaching Online Masterclass (TOM) Series 2

In 2020 we released series 1 of TOM. A series of over 50 bite-sized videos to help educators navigate the world of online teaching and learning. Series 2 will take what was included in series 1 further. It will look at the drivers of motivation, engagement, and learning, as well as the key skills educators, need to develop in their students for online learning success.

If you’re curious to find out how educators around the world are faring, check out some of the interviews and blogs we published last year.

Taking Classes Online Interviews

Episode 1, Dr. Heather McClue about the trials and tribulations of taking her law classes online.

Episode 2, Eduardo Mórlan gives advice on how to teach languages remotely.

Episode 3, Physical Education teacher Kylene Simmons talks about how her school used technology to engage students in health and physical education classes.

Taking Classes Online Blogs

 Taking European Studies and Modern Foreign Languages Online,

Making Adjustments during Remote Learning

Preparing Students With Disabilities To Return To School.

Finally, if you’ve got a story to share or would like to write a blog, send me an email and I’ll be in touch.

References

Chyung, S.Y., (2001) Systematic and systemic approaches to reducing attrition rates in online higher education. American Journal of Distance Education, 15(3): 36-49 DOI: 10.1080/08923640109527092

Kerr, S. (2011). High school online: Pedagogy, preferences, and practices of three online teachers. Journal of Educational Technology Systems,39, 221–244. doi:10.2190/ET.39.3.b

Park, J-H., & Choi, H.J., (2009) Factors influencing adult learners’ decision to drop out or persist in online learning. Educational Technology and Society, 12(4):207-217

Roblyer, M.D. (1999) Is choice important in distance learning? A study of student motives for taking internet-based courses at high school and community college levels, Journal of Research in Computing in Education, 32(1):157-171, https://doi.org/10.1080/08886504.1999.10782621

Ryan, R.M., and Deci, R.M. ( 2000) Self-Determination Theory and the Facilitation of Intrinsic Motivation, Social Development, and Well-Being, American Psychologist, 55(1): 68-78, DOI: 10.1037/0003-066X.55.1.68

Sankarn, S.R., and Bui, T. (2001) Impact learning strategies and motivation on performance: A study in web-based instruction, Journal of Instructional Psychology, 28: 191-198

Skinner, E. A., & Belmont, M. J. (1993). Motivation in the classroom: Reciprocal effects of teacher behavior and student engagement across the school year. Journal of Educational Psychology, 85(4), 571–581. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-0663.85.4.571

Illustration of online learning in 2021

EdTech News – January 2021

2021 has started off with homeschooling in the UK. A webinar I attended earlier this week on Lessons Learned from Covid-19, made it clear the correct term is online learning and not remote learning as there is nothing remote about it. It certainly brings us closer together in that virtual way, but it also opens up new opportunities, such as amazing guest lectures from people who would have otherwise never travelled to give a lecture. You can watch Educate’s webinar here.

At Makematic, we’re continuing to do our best to support those teaching and learning from home with great educational content. For all the teachers out there, you can have a look at our Teaching Online Masterclass course, which justifiably puts pedagogy right at the heart. Our first Masterclass was a huge success, so we’re now in the process of creating a second one and we can’t wait to share it with you in Spring. 

The second ongoing project I wanted to highlight is our Untold History collection. Especially, after this week’s events in Washington and Georgia, there isn’t a better time than now to educate children about America’s incredible history through stories about people, artefacts and events that perhaps aren’t that well known. These videos are sure to engage students and could be a great starting point for a debate. Visit https://untoldhistory.org/ to watch the videos. 

Finally, a story that was written during the first lockdown, but is even more apt now. There’s a huge immediate need for Social-Emotional Learning not just in the classroom, but also in the workplace and at home. There should be a greater focus on adult’s and children’s health and well-being in all that we do. 

Wishing you all the best for 2021. 

Illustration of young girl sitting at her desk in front of a laptop with books and school supplies

10 Reasons Why Educational Videos Are Super Effective

Throughout history, educators have learned through no small feat that in order to connect learning with students, they must adapt their learning resources into what works with each new generation. For Gen Z and Alpha, online videos is the way to go. You probably already know that however, so let’s explain ten reasons why educational videos are super effective for students.

#1 – Engagement

Numerous academic studies have been released on how video increases motivation and deeper learning, while also being able to specifically impact students’ ability to facilitate discussions and identify problems.

Want to learn more about the science behind it? We deeply recommend reading Cynthia J. Blame’s ‘Effective educational videos’ from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee.

#2 – Accessibility

Let’s be honest, accessibility is still an over-looked subject even in 2020 but leaps and bounds are being made to make digital equipment & the virtual space it connects to far more accessibility to a wider range of people, particularly with disabilities.

From subtitling to audio description to transcripts, accessibility is finally becoming more mainstream and we at Makematic continue to discuss what steps we can make to do our part with our own content.

#3 – Portability

Print media is, unfortunately, becoming a thing of the past, especially for the new generations. If COVID-19 has taught us anything, is the need for trustworthy digital, learning resources that can be shared and used immediately around the newly-formed online classroom.

Unsure where to find video content for your students that will work on a wide range of devices? Why not check out our ever-increasing, educational video series on the Makematic VOD available on:

#4 – Ease of Production

You don’t need a PhD to make an effective, learning video, although it may certainly help! As long as you have access to a decent smartphone, you have all the tools at your fingertips to plan, produce and edit an educational video on a subject you love.

For kinesthetic learners, and students with learning disabilities e.g. Dyslexia. Video is a great tool alongside other resource mediums to help overcome barriers when trying to increase your student absorption of cognition & knowledge.

#5 – Replayability

Have you ever re-watched a film or television series and suddenly noticed new things that you didn’t pick up the first time you watched it?

A great benefit for video-based learning is how it allows anyone to pause, stop, rewind, and other timeline manipulation factors that can impact an individual’s learning experience. Unlike the traditional classroom or a group lecture, learning via video – you’d never have to miss something again, just as long as you can re-watch, you can always go back and re-absorb any missing info.

#6 – Visual Factor

Now, I love a good book from time to time, but even have to admit that video is only as good as the source material that inspires it. But that’s not to say the visual element of video is powerful and more appealing to learn from, particularly for my attention span.

Articles, journals, essays and more may feel more offputting to generations raised on television & online video. However, when you combine multiple sources of educational resources together with students, I truly believe you can get the best out of them.

#7 – Authenticity

Humans love to connect with fellow humans and if online video platforms such as YouTube & Twitch have taught us anything, it’s that having a human narration or even industry experts within your video adds a level of user connection that can be lost in translation through other forms of learning resources.

When we released our Teaching Online Masterclass (TOM) series, we had this in mind. The free-to-watch series contains numerous industry experts in the education industry. Why not check it out: https://tom.makematic.com/.

#8 – Collaboration

Successful learning is not just an individualistic experience. Having the ability to work with other people opens the conversation for feedback, ultimately providing students with inter-personal, social skills and the ability to take constructive criticism.

Video is a fun way for your students to create brainstorms and group learning experiences that can allow them to see easily their input to an educational topic while giving them that level of passion needed to connect to the subject matter in ways other mediums may struggle.

#9 – Contextual

Unlike relying on just reading literary materials, video provides strong visual cues. These help learners understand what’s happening, even when the language and prose is hard to follow.

Utilising infographics, source material and first-person accounts within your video help provide that much-needed cognitive downtime when learning and help keep the overall topic visually-stimulating.

#10 – Creativity

Video-based learning is a creative process, even when covering a specialist, STEM topic. It opens cognition to not just utilise the logistic side of your brain, but also your creative side too.

Creative thinking is fast-becoming one of the top employability skills for the future generation and by striving to incorporate video into your classroom, you allow the possibility for your students to begin to train themselves in these fundamental skills going forward.

We strive to inspire creativity through our videos, particularly for subjects that don’t get the reach they should. Just like our Untold Series where we delve into the fascinating history topics throughout the History of America.

Image of Tara Walsh and Eduardo Morlan in this episode of taking classes online

Episode 2: Taking Classes Online

Taking Classes Online is an interview and blog series where real educators share their experiences of teaching online. This month, I had the pleasure of talking to Eduardo Mórlan from Mexico. Eduardo has been teaching online since 2014, so it was great to hear his insights about teaching languages remotely.

My interview technique is improving slightly, but it’s clear there is still a long way to go. Despite that, Eduardo has shared some really great tips and tricks that can be implemented in any online class.

Check Out Teaching Online Masterclass

If you haven’t checked out Teaching Online Masterclass (TOM) yet, I suggest you get started.

You’ll be sure to find something of interest to help you navigate the online teaching and learning space.

If you’ve got a story to share or would like to write a blog, send me an email and I’ll be in touch.

Make sure to check out the first episode of Taking Classes Online where I spoke to UK educator Dr Heather McClue about the trials and tribulations of taking her law classes online.

Screengrab on Tara Walsh and Heather McClue discussing Taking Classes Online

Episode 1: Taking Classes Online

Have you checked out our new educator professional development resource: Teaching Online Masterclass (TOM)? TOM is a free online professional resource for educators to help teachers make the leap to remote teaching and learning.

It’s a cornucopia of resources to help you teach in online and blended learning environments and includes:

Taking Classes Online

Taking Classes Online is a series of interviews and blog articles, by educators for educators to share best practices in online and blended teaching.

In the series, educators share their wins, lessons learned and strategies that they are using successfully to engage and motivate those they teach.

Very little is known about effective online teaching in the K-12 in the educational space. This series aims to help fill this gap.

Blogs

Here are the two latest blogs we’ve published.

If you’re interested in writing a blog, send me an email and I’ll be in touch.

Interviews

Last month, I interviewed, UK educator Dr. Heather McClue about the trials and tribulations of taking her law classes online. Heather generously shared her wins, lessons learned, and strategies that worked when she made the leap to online learning earlier this year.

Be warned, there’s a lot of laughing in the episode. So it might be wise to have the volume down if you’re watching this one.

Do you want to share your story? Send me an email and I’ll be in touch.

What Are You Waiting For?

If you haven’t checked out Teaching Online Masterclass (TOM) yet, I suggest you get started.

You’ll be sure to find something of interest to help you navigate the online teaching and learning space.

Teaching Online Masterclass logo with logos from Adobe, ClickView, iCivics, Makematic and Participate

Launch Of Professional Development Videos To Help Educators Adapt To Online Teaching

We’re pleased to announce that Teaching Online Masterclass (TOM) a free course for educators to help adapt to online teaching is now available to view at tom.makematic.com

TOM is a free online professional development resource for teachers making the leap into remote teaching and learning. With a focus on pedagogy over technology, it’s a catalogue of bite-sized videos produced in partnership with Adobe, ClickView, iCivics and Participate. TOM contains 50+ professional development videos from K-12 online teaching experts about online pedagogy, designing online classes and curriculum, building communities of practice and digital well-being.

“TOM is a series that has been created with K-12 educators in mind. It focuses on online pedagogy over technology and really takes into account what the research tells us works in this space. The contributors were carefully chosen because of their expertise in the K-12 education space, as practitioners or professionals who really know what it takes to be a super online educator. More than ever educators are crying out for resources such as this, and that’s why it’s such an exciting project to be involved in.” Tara Walsh, Makematic’s Director of Engagement and Innovation, said.

“We work with tens of thousands of incredible teachers who are facing so much uncertainty in their work. That makes it extra important for one thing to remain certain – that teachers are talented professionals who know what effective instruction looks like. With the right guidance, there’s no reason they can’t transfer that effective instruction to online spaces. TOM is that guidance. It meets teachers where they are and provides targeted and convenient coaching to elevate their online practice.” said iCivics’ Chief Education Officer, Emma Humphries.

TOM is now available to watch for free at tom.makematic.com.

TOM is also available at Adobe Education Exchange. Sign up to earn an Adobe digital badge and 4 hours of accredited professional learning.

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